There is a very useful and personalized credit dispute system that American Debt Consolidation uses. And, the Credit Repair System starts with you getting a free credit analysis. From that, a custom credit repair strategy is prepared and a dispute timeline is laid out. Plus, each person's situation will have legal challenges applied to it.
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What Landlords Do With Your Credit Score
    While you should always read a credit report, the score itself can say a lot about a person. Some landlords will not consider any person with a credit score of under 650, keeping an apartment empty until they find someone with a 700 or more credit score. A person who has a credit score of more than 700 can buy their own home but have chosen instead to rent. A person with a credit score of less than 650 has problems paying their bills, perhaps for good reasons as well.
  Whatever those reasons are, it's the person's business to get their score up, not the landlords. A landlord's business is based more on their tenants' ability and willingness to pay their rent and utility bills. It's not just about scores; the report is also important. After all, a person can be dinged for the craziest things. For example: they may have too many credit cards but not one of those credit cards has a balance or even a large balance. Rather, it's best to look at how many things are in collection, what a person's payment history is like and if there are any civil judgments. Some landlords will look at prior addresses to talk with previous landlords and/or employers. Some landlords will also take into consideration life happenstances such as: divorce, medical problems, student loans, etc.
A person who has a lot of student loans can be dinged and have a low score as a result. A person can have medical insurance but be socked with the co-pay.

    Rather, it's best to look at how many things are in collection, what a person's payment history is like and if there are any civil judgments. Some landlords will look at prior addresses to talk with previous landlords and/or employers. Some landlords will also take into consideration life happenstances such as: divorce, medical problems, student loans, etc. A person who has a lot of student loans can be dinged and have a low score as a result. A person can have medical insurance but be socked with the co-pay.

    One landlord had a tenant whose wife died after a long battle with cancer. The debt he had was massive but he still managed to pay his rent. When it comes to divorces, it's always best to look at when it took place. If everything looks good before the divorce took place and then it just takes a nosedive, you can see that the divorce was the root of the problem. Vengeful spouses and their attorneys can cause a bad situation to turn worse financially. A credit report is a guide but it's not the end all, be all to a person's financial history.

    Most landlords will look up the last two addresses and don't put much stock into credit card debt, student loans and medical bills. Rather, paying promptly on utility and rent bills is going to give more weight than the above bills. Landlords tend to reject tenants who have been given to a collection agency for their utility bill.

12.02.2010
    The National Community Reinvestment Coalition on Tuesday filed complaints that allege 22 banks around the nation were in violation of fair housing laws by not issuing Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans to borrowers who had credit scores that made the threshold the government set. According to the FHA, borrowers who have a credit score of 580 or more are eligible for insurance it gives against default. However, many FHA lenders demand that borrowers have higher credit scores.
    The NCRC said these lenders' requirements were harming the African-American and Hispanic communities, as their credit scores tend to fall just under the 580 threshold and the higher benchmark scores banks have set.

12.06.2010
    In the week ending on Dec. 3, 2010, the Mortgage Bankers Association made public its Weekly Mortgage Applications Survey. This covers more than 50 percent of all residential mortgage loan applications in the United States that were taken by commercial banks, mortgage bankers and thrifts. The information it provides gives a quick view of the consumer demand for worthwhile mortgage loans.
    When the environment is set in a low mortgage rate, the trend of rising refinance applications means consumers are trying to lower their monthly payments to gain more spending money. If consumers can reduce their mortgage payment and increase their disposable income because of the refinancing, it's better for the economy. After all, the extra money can be spent on little extras at the store or on debt. However, a falling trend of home buying applications means there is a drop in the demand for homes. This is seen as bad, not just for the housing sector, but also the economy.